Wednesday, September 24, 2014
   
Text Size

Articles

Figure Skating

Parent Category: Things To Know

figure_skater_spin_hold_foot_md_wht

ice_skates_skating_lg_wht

figure_skater_woman_lift_man_md_wht

blackfactswhitebkg

1.  The convenience and efficiency of ice skating to cross large, icy areas is shown in archaeological evidence by the finding of primitive animal bone skates in places such as Scandinavia, Sweden, Great Britain, Russia, Germany and Switzerland.

2.  Wooden skates with iron facings appeared in the 14th Century. Skates that were made entirely of iron were introduced in the 17th  century. Steel skates, with straps and clamps that fastened them to the shoes and boots, were sold in the 1850s.

3.  Skates that had the blades permanently attached to the boot were invented around the beginning of the 20th century.

4.  The next step in the development of ice skating came in 1742, when the first ice skating association was formed.  It was called the Edinburgh Skating Club.

5.  The first instructional book concerning ice skating was published in London in 1772. The book was written by a British artillery lieutenant named Robert Jones.  His book describes basic figure skating forms such as circles and figure eights. This book was only written for men, because women did not ice skate in the 18th century. This manual has ice skating split into its two main disciplines, speed skating and figure skating.

6.  Jackson Haines, an American, revolutionized figure skating in the 1860s.  He began having skaters skate to music and use ballet moves in their programs.

7.  Figure skating was the first winter sport included in the Olympic Games when it appeared at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London.

8.  The singles and pairs competitions also appeared in the 1920 Antwerp Summer Games before making their winter debut in Chamonix in 1924.

9.  Modern figure skating is divided into four parts: single skating events for both sexes, pair skating, ice dancing, and synchronized skating.

10.  A figure skate can be easily distinguished from other skates by the toe pick at the front end of the blade.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

blacklinkswhitebkg
Fast Facts Resources
World Figure Skating Museum
U.S. Figure Skating
Figure Skating at the 2010 Olympics
Stamp from the United States Postal Service

 

 

suspicious
suspicious
suspicious
suspicious